Spices I Have

 

Basil
Called the "royal herb" by ancient Greeks, this annual is a member of the mint family. Fresh basil has a pungent flavor that some describe as a cross between licorice and cloves. It's a key herb in Mediterranean cooking, essential to the delicious Italian pesto, and is becoming more and more popular in American cuisine. Most varieties of basil have green leaves, but one—opal basil—is a beautiful purple color. Lemon basil, anise basil, clove basil and cinnamon basil have green leaves, but their perfumy fragrance and flavor matches their respective names. Basil is a summer herb but can be grown successfully inside during the winter in a sunny window. It's plentiful during summer months and available year-round in many markets. Choose evenly colored leaves with no sign of wilting. Refrigerate basil, wrapped in barely damp paper towels and then in a plastic bag, for up to four days. Or store a bunch of basil, stems down, in a glass of water with a plastic bag over the leaves. Refrigerate in this manner for up to a week, changing the water every two days. To preserve fresh basil, wash and dry the leaves and place layers of leaves, then coarse salt, in a container that can be tightly sealed. Alternatively, finely chop the cleaned basil and combine it with a small amount of olive oil or water. Freeze in tiny portions to flavor sauces, salad dressings, etc. Dried basil, though it bears little resemblance in either flavor or aroma to the fresh herb, can be purchased in the spice section of most supermarkets. Store dried basil airtight in a cool, dark place for up to six months.
Bay Leaves
Also called laurel leaf or bay laurel, this aromatic herb comes from the evergreen bay laurel tree, native to the Mediterranean. Early Greeks and Romans attributed magical properties to the laurel leaf, and it has long been a symbol of honor, celebration and triumph, as in "winning your laurels." The two main varieties of bay leaf are Turkish (which has 1- to 2-inch-long oval leaves) and Californian (with narrow 2- to 3-inch-long leaves). The Turkish bay leaves have a more subtle flavor than do the California variety. Bay leaves are used to flavor soups, stews, vegetables and meats. They're generally removed before serving. Overuse of this herb can make a dish bitter. Fresh bay leaves are seldom available in markets. Dried bay leaves, which have a fraction of the flavor of fresh, can be found in supermarkets. Store dried bay leaves airtight in a cool, dark place for up to six months.
Celery Salt
The seed of a wild celery called lovage, most of which comes from India. Celery seed has a strong flavor and should therefore be used sparingly. It's used in pickling and to flavor soups, salads and various meat dishes. mixed with Salt
Chives
Related to the onion and leek, this fragrant herb has slender vivid green hollow stems. Chives have a mild onion flavor and are available fresh year-round. Look for those with a uniform green color and no signs of wilting or browning. Store in a plastic bag in the refrigerator up to a week. Fresh chives can be snipped with scissors to the desired length. They're delicious in many cooked dishes but should be added toward the end of the cooking time to retain their flavor. Both chives and their edible lavender flowers are a tasty and colorful addition to salads. Frozen and freeze-dried chives are also available in most supermarkets. Chives are a good source of vitamin A and also contain a fair amount of potassium and calcium.
Coriander Seed
Native to the Mediterranean and the Orient, coriander is related to the parsley family. It's known for both its seeds (actually the dried, ripe fruit of the plant) and for its dark green lacy leaves (cilantro). The flavors of the seeds and leaves bear absolutely no resemblance to each other. Mention of coriander was found in early Sanskrit writings, and the seeds themselves have been discovered in Egyptian tombs dating to 960 B.C. The tiny yellow-tan seeds are lightly ridged. They are mildly fragrant and have an aromatic flavor akin to a combination of lemon, sage and caraway. Whole coriander seeds are used in pickling and for special drinks such as mulled wine. Ground seed is used in many baked goods (particularly Scandinavian), curry blends, soups, etc. Both forms are commonly available in supermarkets. Coriander leaves are commonly known as cilantro and Chinese parsley. They have an extremely pungent (some say fetid) odor and flavor that lends itself well to highly seasoned food. Though it's purported to be the world's most widely used herb, many Americans and Europeans find that fresh coriander is definitely an acquired taste. Choose leaves with an even green color and no sign of wilting. Store a bunch of coriander, stems down, in a glass of water with a plastic bag over the leaves. Refrigerate in this manner for up to a week, changing the water every two days. Coriander leaves are used widely in the cuisines of India, Mexico, the Orient and the Caribbean.
Fennel Seed
Common fennel is the variety from which the oval greenish-brown fennel seeds come. The seeds are available whole and ground and are used in both sweet and savory foods, as well as to flavor many liqueurs. They should be stored in a cool, dark place for no more than six months.
Herbes De Provence
An assortment of dried herbs said to reflect those most commonly used in southern France. The blend can be found packed in tiny clay crocks in the spice section of large supermarkets. The mixture commonly contains basil, fennel seed, lavender, marjoram, rosemary, sage, summer savory and thyme. The blend can be used to season dishes of meat, poultry and vegetables.
Italian Seasoning Italian Seasoning is a blend of ground spices used to flavor many Italian dishes. The main ingredients are basil, oregano, rosemary, and thyme. Common additions to taste also include garlic powder, sage, and cilantro.
Lemon Pepper Lemon pepper (also called lemon pepper seasoning) is a seasoning made from granulated lemon zest and cracked black peppercorns. The lemon zest is mashed with the pepper to allow the citrus oil to infuse into the pepper. This mix is then baked and dried and can be used on meats (particularly poultry) and pasta, although it was originally used primarily for seafood.

Lemon pepper is generally commercially available in small jars, although it may also be homemade. Commercially available lemon pepper may also include smaller amounts of other ingredients such as salt, sugar, onion, garlic, citric acid, additional lemon flavor, cayenne pepper, and other spices.

marjoram



 

Early Greeks wove marjoram into funeral wreaths and planted it on graves to symbolize their loved ones' happiness both in life and beyond. There are many species of this ancient herb, which is a member of the mint family. The most widely available is sweet marjoram, usually simply called "marjoram." It has oval inch-long, pale green leaves and a mild, sweet, oreganolike flavor (wild marjoram is another name for oregano). Marjoram is available fresh in some produce markets and supermarkets with large fresh-herb sections. More often it is found dried in small bottles or cans. There's also a very hardy species called pot marjoram, which has a stronger, slightly bitter flavor. It's found throughout Mediterranean countries but rarely seen in the United States. Marjoram can be used to flavor a variety of foods, particularly meats (especially lamb and veal) and vegetables. Because marjoram's flavor is so delicate, it's best added toward the end of the cooking time so its essence doesn't dissipate.
Mint (Crushed)
Greek mythology claims that mint, long a symbol of hospitality, was once the nymph Mentha. She angered Pluto's wife, Persephone, who turned her into this aromatic herb. There are more than 30 species of mint, the two most popular and widely available being peppermint and spearmint. Peppermint is the more pungent of the two. It has bright green leaves, purple-tinged stems and a peppery flavor. Spearmint leaves are gray-green or true green and have a milder flavor and fragrance. Mint grows wild throughout the world and is cultivated in Europe, the United States and Asia. It's most plentiful during summer months but many markets carry it year-round. Choose leaves that are evenly colored with no sign of wilting. Store a bunch of mint, stems down, in a glass of water with a plastic bag over the leaves. Refrigerate in this manner for up to a week, changing the water every two days. Mint is used in both sweet and savory dishes and in drinks such as the famous mint julep. Mint is available fresh, dried, as an extract, and in the form of oil of spearmint or oil of peppermint, both highly concentrated flavorings. Most forms can usually be found in supermarkets.
Oregano
Greek for "joy of the mountain," oregano was almost unheard of in the United States until soldiers came back from Italian World War II assignments raving about it. This herb, sometimes called wild marjoram, belongs to the mint family and is related to both marjoram and thyme. Oregano is similar to marjoram but is not as sweet and has a stronger, more pungent flavor and aroma. Because of its pungency, it requires a bit more caution in its use. Mediterranean oregano is milder than the Mexican variety, which is generally used in highly spiced dishes. Fresh Mediterranean or European oregano is sometimes available in gourmet produce sections of supermarkets and in Italian or Greek markets. Choose bright green, fresh-looking bunches with no sign of wilting or yellowing. Refrigerate in a plastic bag for up to three days. Dried Mediterranean oregano is readily available in any supermarket in both crumbled and powdered forms. The stronger-flavored Mexican oregano can generally be found in its dried form in Latin markets. As with all dried herbs, oregano should be stored in a cool, dark place for no more than six months. Oregano goes extremely well with tomato-based dishes and is a familiar pizza herb.
Parsley
n ancient times parsley wreaths were used to ward off drunkenness—though proof of their efficacy in that capacity is scarce. Today, this slightly peppery, fresh-flavored herb is more commonly used as a flavoring and garnish. Though there are more than 30 varieties of this herb, the most popular are curly-leaf parsley and the more strongly flavored Italian or flat-leaf parsley. Fresh curly leaf parsley is widely available year-round, whereas Italian parsley must sometimes be searched out in gourmet produce markets. Parsley is sold in bunches and should be chosen for its bright-green leaves that show no sign of wilting. Wash fresh parsley, shaking off excess moisture, and wrap first in paper towels, then in a plastic bag. Refrigerate for up to a week. Dried parsley is available in the spice section of most supermarkets but bears little resemblance to the flavor of fresh. Parsley is an excellent source of vitamins A and C.
Pizza Seasoning
Salt, tomato powder, Romano cheese powder, cheddar cheese powder, paprika, basil, garlic powder, onion powder, oregano, fennel, black pepper. - See more at: http://www.spiceandtea.com/pizza-seasoning-spice-blend.html#sthash.jMHOPmmM.dpuf
Salt, tomato powder, Romano cheese powder, cheddar cheese powder, paprika, basil, garlic powder, onion powder, oregano, fennel, black pepper. - See more at: http://www.spiceandtea.com/pizza-seasoning-spice-blend.html#sthash.jMHOPmmM.dpuf
Salt, tomato powder, Romano cheese powder, cheddar cheese powder, paprika, basil, garlic powder, onion powder, oregano, fennel, black pepper. - See more at: http://www.spiceandtea.com/pizza-seasoning-spice-blend.html#sthash.jMHOPmmM.dpuf
Salt, tomato powder, Romano cheese powder, cheddar cheese powder, paprika, basil, garlic powder, onion powder, oregano, fennel, black pepper. - See more at: http://www.spiceandtea.com/pizza-seasoning-spice-blend.html#sthash.jMHOPmmM.dpuf
Salt, tomato powder, Romano cheese powder, cheddar cheese powder, paprika, basil, garlic powder, onion powder, oregano, fennel, black pepper. - See more at: http://www.spiceandtea.com/pizza-seasoning-spice-blend.html#sthash.jMHOPmmM.dpuf
Salt, tomato powder, Romano cheese powder, cheddar cheese powder, paprika, basil, garlic powder, onion powder, oregano, fennel, black pepper. - See more at: http://www.spiceandtea.com/pizza-seasoning-spice-blend.html#sthash.jMHOPmmM.dpuf
Salt, tomato powder, Romano cheese powder, cheddar cheese powder, paprika, basil, garlic powder, onion powder, oregano, fennel, black pepper. - See more at: http://www.spiceandtea.com/pizza-seasoning-spice-blend.html#sthash.jMHOPmmM.dpuf
Salt, tomato powder, Romano cheese powder, cheddar cheese powder, paprika, basil, garlic powder, onion powder, oregano, fennel, black pepper. - See more at: http://www.spiceandtea.com/pizza-seasoning-spice-blend.html#sthash.jMHOPmmM.dpuf

Pizza Seasoning, a salt-free blend of seasonings to spice up every pizza. Use this classic flavor when making homemade pizza or add it to your takeout pizza for extra flavor and color. This seasoning will hit the spot, whether you choose to make your pizza from scratch or to cook a frozen version. You can also use this to make pizza bread or as an additional seasoning on garlic bread.

Hand blended from Mediterranean oregano, basil, garlic, onion, thyme, fennel seed, red bell pepper, crush red pepper, parsley and marjoram

Rosemary
Used since 500 B.C., rosemary is native to the Mediterranean area (where it grows wild) but is now cultivated throughout Europe and the United States. Early on, this mint-family member was used to cure ailments of the nervous system. Rosemary's silver-green needle-shaped leaves are highly aromatic, and their flavor hints of both lemon and pine. This herb is available in whole-leaf form (fresh and dried) as well as powdered. Rosemary essence is used both to flavor food and to scent cosmetics. Rosemary can be used as a seasoning in a variety of dishes including fruit salads, soups, vegetables, meat (particularly lamb), fish and egg dishes, stuffings and dressings.
Sea Salt Naturally harvested from the French Mediterranean. Sea salt tends to be coarser and have a higher concentration of minerals than table salt. Its sodium level is comparable to table salt. This salt does not supply iodine, a necessary nutrient.
Season Salt Salt, Sugar, Spices (Including Paprika And Turmeric), Onion, Cornstarch, Garlic, Tricalcium Phosphate (Prevents Caking), Natural Flavor, Paprika Oleoresin (For Color). Contains No Msg.

 


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Most recent revision Tuesday, October 24, 2017 02:16:37 AM

 

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